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Casa Con Vista

Grant

Casa Con Vista

Neighbourhoods
Javea is a small, historic town, free of high rise buildings offering a relaxing holiday atmosphere. The local people are friendly and affable. The clean, warm, blue Mediterranean Sea laps the beautiful beaches and coves that Javea has to offer. With its variety of landscape, ranging from sandy coastlines to rugged mountain areas, its mild year-round climate, its careful planning policies and extensive tourist facilities, Javea is a jewel on the Costa Blanca, combining beauty and modern facilities with the charm of an ancient fishing village.
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Xàbia
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Javea is a small, historic town, free of high rise buildings offering a relaxing holiday atmosphere. The local people are friendly and affable. The clean, warm, blue Mediterranean Sea laps the beautiful beaches and coves that Javea has to offer. With its variety of landscape, ranging from sandy coastlines to rugged mountain areas, its mild year-round climate, its careful planning policies and extensive tourist facilities, Javea is a jewel on the Costa Blanca, combining beauty and modern facilities with the charm of an ancient fishing village.
One of the main tourist destinations on Spain’s Costa Blanca, Calpe has been home to many ancient civilisations, which means it has a fascinating history and some remnants of its past, such as its Roman Baths that you can see today. Embraced by a wonderful landscape, where vineyards and mountains are a feature, Calpe is probably best known for its good value fish restaurants and lovely sandy beaches. Calm waters lap up against a shore that continues on for around 11 km, in a spot where somehow or other modern tourism blends with natural beauty, culture and gastronomy. Expect this variety, which includes on one hand some high-rise buildings close to the beach, but on the other hand the wonderful symbolic rock, Penon Ifach, which you’ve most likely seen already in photos. In the same way you’ll find that very deep-rooted traditions seem to co-exist harmoniously enough with the tourist industry. And even though it is one of the Costa Blanca’s busier spots, it seems to have mainly retained an attitude of warm hospitality. Breathe in the pure sea air, while taking in the beautiful views of the surrounding nature. Discover interesting flora and fauna on some of the routes, like the Sierra de Oltà, Las Salinas Natural Park, Vormar and of course Peñón de Ifach. If you like a buzzing tourist destination, with good weather, local seafood cuisine, a historic old quarter, along with outdoor activities, fiestas and nightlife – then you’re heading to the right place.
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Calp
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One of the main tourist destinations on Spain’s Costa Blanca, Calpe has been home to many ancient civilisations, which means it has a fascinating history and some remnants of its past, such as its Roman Baths that you can see today. Embraced by a wonderful landscape, where vineyards and mountains are a feature, Calpe is probably best known for its good value fish restaurants and lovely sandy beaches. Calm waters lap up against a shore that continues on for around 11 km, in a spot where somehow or other modern tourism blends with natural beauty, culture and gastronomy. Expect this variety, which includes on one hand some high-rise buildings close to the beach, but on the other hand the wonderful symbolic rock, Penon Ifach, which you’ve most likely seen already in photos. In the same way you’ll find that very deep-rooted traditions seem to co-exist harmoniously enough with the tourist industry. And even though it is one of the Costa Blanca’s busier spots, it seems to have mainly retained an attitude of warm hospitality. Breathe in the pure sea air, while taking in the beautiful views of the surrounding nature. Discover interesting flora and fauna on some of the routes, like the Sierra de Oltà, Las Salinas Natural Park, Vormar and of course Peñón de Ifach. If you like a buzzing tourist destination, with good weather, local seafood cuisine, a historic old quarter, along with outdoor activities, fiestas and nightlife – then you’re heading to the right place.
The town of Denia is large with a real Spanish feel. It’s a working town unlike Javea (for example) which is very much more a tourist town. The main street in Denia has shady plane trees, loads of cafes and designer shops. It’s almost like being in a big city. Denia’s facilities are excellent – a modern hospital, spas, two high quality golf courses in La Sella and Oliva Nova. ferry-DeniaAt night Denia buzzes with nightlife, not necessarily discos but more with the hundreds of bars, live entertainment and restaurants, many of which are right on the sea front. There is charm and atmosphere. If you are looking for a younger more happening place, packed with clubs you would be better off trying Benidorm. Many parts of Denia are quite industrialised, this is not your typical fishing village turned tourist resort however it does appeal to some people because of this. Whereas many other towns empty for the winter with many restaurants and bars shuttered up, Denia hustles and bustles all year round with a good variety of amenities and facilities.
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Dénia
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The town of Denia is large with a real Spanish feel. It’s a working town unlike Javea (for example) which is very much more a tourist town. The main street in Denia has shady plane trees, loads of cafes and designer shops. It’s almost like being in a big city. Denia’s facilities are excellent – a modern hospital, spas, two high quality golf courses in La Sella and Oliva Nova. ferry-DeniaAt night Denia buzzes with nightlife, not necessarily discos but more with the hundreds of bars, live entertainment and restaurants, many of which are right on the sea front. There is charm and atmosphere. If you are looking for a younger more happening place, packed with clubs you would be better off trying Benidorm. Many parts of Denia are quite industrialised, this is not your typical fishing village turned tourist resort however it does appeal to some people because of this. Whereas many other towns empty for the winter with many restaurants and bars shuttered up, Denia hustles and bustles all year round with a good variety of amenities and facilities.
In the centre of the La Marina Baixa region, is the popular Spanish resort of Benidorm, one of the main tourist destinations along the Costa Blanca. Its excellent beaches, wide variety of accommodation, restaurants and many recreational activities means it’s a hit with tourists from all over Spain and Northern Europe. Benidorm offers endless possibilities: from taking a walk along the promenade, swimming in the crystal clear waters, water sports, a boat excursion to the island of Tabarca, or a wander through Benidorm’s historic quarter, perched on a promontory, the old town is in great contrast to the wide avenues of the main tourist town. Then there are the local cultural festivals, beautiful cuisine and great shopping; indeed it’s one of the Costa Blanca’s biggest tourist centres. Complete with its fine-sand beaches, crystal waters, privileged climate and great infrastructure have all gone to give Benidorm have granted this region —also equipped with a great infrastructure of high-quality services— its well-deserved fame. Benidorm is what you want it to be: full of fun, with a fantastic nightlife, but is also affords peace and tranquillity with its charming gardens and secluded coves. Truly a place with something for everyone, it’s no wonder it's so popular. Golf There are numerous championship courses in and around Benidorm offering a good challenge to the serious and casual golfer alike. Beaches

 Without doubt, the beaches are one of Benidorm’s biggest attractions. A five-kilometre stretch of golden sand coastline, intermingled with secluded coves where one can enjoy a refreshing swim, as well as engage in water sports, like scuba diving, water skiing, windsurfing, sailing, and more. 

 Located to the north of the harbour, Levante beach is one of the most beautiful in the city. As a result of its urban location, it has easy access to many services, as well as the two kilometres of golden, fine sands. These emblematic sands are bordered by a busy promenade, filled with terraces and restaurants, which are very lively at night. To the south of the region, you find Poniente beach, where three kilometres of beautiful scenery unfolds. As with the Levante beach, Poniente has a long promenade and is accessible and convenient, with many facilities at hand. 

 Between these two famous Benidorm beaches, is the Mal Pas cove; a tranquil cove of fine sands, close to the historic quarter and the harbour. 
In addition, Ti Ximo and La Almadrava emerge at the northern end of Benidorm, where the coast becomes rough and inaccessible. Removed from the urban centre, these hidden natural coves allow the visitor to escape from the bustle of the city and enjoy scuba-diving around the magnificent, rocky seabed. History

 Benidorm’s historic centre is located on a promontory, between its two main beaches – Levante and Poniente. This is the birthplace of the city, a primitive fishing town, dominated by the church of San Jaime. Erected in the 18th century, its bluish domes rise among an intricate network of narrow streets and alleyways, filled with picturesque little corners. The peaks of the Canfali hills lead to the Balcony of the Mediterranean, a splendid viewpoint that presents a gorgeous panoramic view of the sea. 

 Modern Benidorm On either side of the historic quarter lay wide avenues and commercial streets that make up the rather more modern Benidorm. The city, devoted to the tourist industry, offers a myriad of services including hotels, restaurants, large commercial areas, discos and terraces. Leisure & recreation

 Benidorm’s recreational possibilities are endless. From taking a walk on the promenade or visiting the nearby park of L’Aigüera, to an exciting day in the Mediterranean Theme Park Terra Mítica. The city also has a number of sporting centres, including a sailing school, and several scuba-diving schools. Excursions Boat excursions to the little island of Benidorm – located in middle of the inlet – depart from the harbour. Legend has it that the island is a piece of rock from nearby Mount Campana that brave Roland severed with his sword during the expeditions of Charlemagne. The diverse seabed makes it a scuba-diving paradise. Cuisine

 Seafood and rice dishes are the base of the local gastronomy. Paella is one of the emblematic dishes, as are shellfish, grilled or boiled and fish, fried, stewed, or in soup. Garlic and olive oil are the main ingredients of ali-oli sauce, which accompanies many dishes and for dessert lovers, try the almond cake, turrón or home-made ice cream. Wines, with Designation of Origin - Alicante (the prestigious seal of quality and origin given in Spain to select wines and products) should definitely be sampled. Misteleta (a sweet wine); and horchata (a drink made from tiger nuts), are both typical of the region.
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Benidorm
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In the centre of the La Marina Baixa region, is the popular Spanish resort of Benidorm, one of the main tourist destinations along the Costa Blanca. Its excellent beaches, wide variety of accommodation, restaurants and many recreational activities means it’s a hit with tourists from all over Spain and Northern Europe. Benidorm offers endless possibilities: from taking a walk along the promenade, swimming in the crystal clear waters, water sports, a boat excursion to the island of Tabarca, or a wander through Benidorm’s historic quarter, perched on a promontory, the old town is in great contrast to the wide avenues of the main tourist town. Then there are the local cultural festivals, beautiful cuisine and great shopping; indeed it’s one of the Costa Blanca’s biggest tourist centres. Complete with its fine-sand beaches, crystal waters, privileged climate and great infrastructure have all gone to give Benidorm have granted this region —also equipped with a great infrastructure of high-quality services— its well-deserved fame. Benidorm is what you want it to be: full of fun, with a fantastic nightlife, but is also affords peace and tranquillity with its charming gardens and secluded coves. Truly a place with something for everyone, it’s no wonder it's so popular. Golf There are numerous championship courses in and around Benidorm offering a good challenge to the serious and casual golfer alike. Beaches

 Without doubt, the beaches are one of Benidorm’s biggest attractions. A five-kilometre stretch of golden sand coastline, intermingled with secluded coves where one can enjoy a refreshing swim, as well as engage in water sports, like scuba diving, water skiing, windsurfing, sailing, and more. 

 Located to the north of the harbour, Levante beach is one of the most beautiful in the city. As a result of its urban location, it has easy access to many services, as well as the two kilometres of golden, fine sands. These emblematic sands are bordered by a busy promenade, filled with terraces and restaurants, which are very lively at night. To the south of the region, you find Poniente beach, where three kilometres of beautiful scenery unfolds. As with the Levante beach, Poniente has a long promenade and is accessible and convenient, with many facilities at hand. 

 Between these two famous Benidorm beaches, is the Mal Pas cove; a tranquil cove of fine sands, close to the historic quarter and the harbour. 
In addition, Ti Ximo and La Almadrava emerge at the northern end of Benidorm, where the coast becomes rough and inaccessible. Removed from the urban centre, these hidden natural coves allow the visitor to escape from the bustle of the city and enjoy scuba-diving around the magnificent, rocky seabed. History

 Benidorm’s historic centre is located on a promontory, between its two main beaches – Levante and Poniente. This is the birthplace of the city, a primitive fishing town, dominated by the church of San Jaime. Erected in the 18th century, its bluish domes rise among an intricate network of narrow streets and alleyways, filled with picturesque little corners. The peaks of the Canfali hills lead to the Balcony of the Mediterranean, a splendid viewpoint that presents a gorgeous panoramic view of the sea. 

 Modern Benidorm On either side of the historic quarter lay wide avenues and commercial streets that make up the rather more modern Benidorm. The city, devoted to the tourist industry, offers a myriad of services including hotels, restaurants, large commercial areas, discos and terraces. Leisure & recreation

 Benidorm’s recreational possibilities are endless. From taking a walk on the promenade or visiting the nearby park of L’Aigüera, to an exciting day in the Mediterranean Theme Park Terra Mítica. The city also has a number of sporting centres, including a sailing school, and several scuba-diving schools. Excursions Boat excursions to the little island of Benidorm – located in middle of the inlet – depart from the harbour. Legend has it that the island is a piece of rock from nearby Mount Campana that brave Roland severed with his sword during the expeditions of Charlemagne. The diverse seabed makes it a scuba-diving paradise. Cuisine

 Seafood and rice dishes are the base of the local gastronomy. Paella is one of the emblematic dishes, as are shellfish, grilled or boiled and fish, fried, stewed, or in soup. Garlic and olive oil are the main ingredients of ali-oli sauce, which accompanies many dishes and for dessert lovers, try the almond cake, turrón or home-made ice cream. Wines, with Designation of Origin - Alicante (the prestigious seal of quality and origin given in Spain to select wines and products) should definitely be sampled. Misteleta (a sweet wine); and horchata (a drink made from tiger nuts), are both typical of the region.
Moraria, nestled on the coast between Calpe and Jávea is a very sought after place to live for wealthy retirees and British expats. Once a small fishing village until only 50 years ago, it’s now a bustling town whilst having kept much of its lovely Spanish charm. Moraira is one of the few coastal towns in Costa Blanca that has not succumbed to the temptation of building high-rise holiday accommodation. Instead, the feel of a small up-market village has thankfully been retained. Moraira is set against the envious backdrop of mountains, vineyards and pinewoods, with a 16th century castle nestled into its coastline. Moraira is truly a desirable place to live. In fact, the combination of scenery, exclusive lifestyle and wonderful climate make owning a property in Moraira an opportunity not to be missed. Here we look at the activities available for those living in Moraira, eating out, beaches and why properties in Moraira are so sought after. Activities The town council of Teulada-Moraira has arranged some free of charge beach activities in the form of Tai Chi, aerobics, swimming and keep fit classes. There’s a list of timings available from a visit to the tourist information office at the town hall or visit their website at www.teuladamoraira.org You’ll see a long list of things to see and do during the rest of the year – like the 15th Spanish Motorboat Championship and the Moors and Christians festivities which are fantastic. If you have missed anything to do with this latter ancient rivalry, there is always next year. The costumes are magnificent and the parade music is infectious. It makes you want to join in the marching. On a regular basis, the Teulada-Moraira Lions arrange events, always to a very high standard. Another organisation that’s invaluable to part-time or permanent residents here in Teulada-Moraira is U3A. Although the annual fee is 10 euros per person – it’s non-profit making and the 50 odd various groups are open to all members. The group activities range from 10 pin bowling to yoga, so there’s something for everyone, regardless of age or physical fitness. Properly, U3A is open to all nationalities, but business is conducted in English, and it’s a perfect platform for creating new friendships. Dining out in Moraira Moraira doesn’t offer much experience in authentic Spanish cuisine but there is a wide variety of international cuisine available. The exception to this is found on a visit to the numerous Spanish bars in Moraira village. There you’ll find fantastic tapas on the menus. If you’re looking for a formal restaurant then there are hundreds of restaurants to choose from. Some aim at the holidaymakers, others at British expat residents (prices approx 10-15 euros per head). What’s lovely about Moraira is you can go for a meal and walk back to your car in the early hours without any trouble unlike some places. It’s very safe and one of the reasons why it’s so popular with affluent retirees and British expats. Locals will say “good morning/good afternoon/ or good night” and many Spaniards in Moraira speak reasonably good English. However, if you try to speak to them in Spanish, they show their delight and spend time helping you. The natives are lovely! Beaches The main beach in Moraira is Ampolla and is ideal for all ages thanks to its gentle gradient. Those who live in Moraira make regular visits to the lovely secluded sandy bay of El Portet where you can eat and drink looking out across the ocean. El Portet is approx 1k from Moraira centre. There’s lot of car parking available but a walk from the centre is recommended to take in the stunning views on offer. Gaze at the picturesque marina and down into the azure waters of the El Portet beach. In the distance you’ll spot Calpe and the famous Calpe rock. The view of Calpe makes you gratefully realise that Moraira has not succumbed to high-rises. At El Portet beach you’ll find jaw dropping luxury villas clinging to the cliffside, and the walkway behind the beach has several friendly bar/restaurants serving mid-morning coffee and light lunches. Those with a hearty appetite and a full wallet will find a top quality restaurant called Le Dauphin Restaurant overlooking the beach. Their signature dish, oven roasted Crown of Lamb, is superb, and all ingredients for their dishes are freshly sourced each day.
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íbúar mæla með
Moraira
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Moraria, nestled on the coast between Calpe and Jávea is a very sought after place to live for wealthy retirees and British expats. Once a small fishing village until only 50 years ago, it’s now a bustling town whilst having kept much of its lovely Spanish charm. Moraira is one of the few coastal towns in Costa Blanca that has not succumbed to the temptation of building high-rise holiday accommodation. Instead, the feel of a small up-market village has thankfully been retained. Moraira is set against the envious backdrop of mountains, vineyards and pinewoods, with a 16th century castle nestled into its coastline. Moraira is truly a desirable place to live. In fact, the combination of scenery, exclusive lifestyle and wonderful climate make owning a property in Moraira an opportunity not to be missed. Here we look at the activities available for those living in Moraira, eating out, beaches and why properties in Moraira are so sought after. Activities The town council of Teulada-Moraira has arranged some free of charge beach activities in the form of Tai Chi, aerobics, swimming and keep fit classes. There’s a list of timings available from a visit to the tourist information office at the town hall or visit their website at www.teuladamoraira.org You’ll see a long list of things to see and do during the rest of the year – like the 15th Spanish Motorboat Championship and the Moors and Christians festivities which are fantastic. If you have missed anything to do with this latter ancient rivalry, there is always next year. The costumes are magnificent and the parade music is infectious. It makes you want to join in the marching. On a regular basis, the Teulada-Moraira Lions arrange events, always to a very high standard. Another organisation that’s invaluable to part-time or permanent residents here in Teulada-Moraira is U3A. Although the annual fee is 10 euros per person – it’s non-profit making and the 50 odd various groups are open to all members. The group activities range from 10 pin bowling to yoga, so there’s something for everyone, regardless of age or physical fitness. Properly, U3A is open to all nationalities, but business is conducted in English, and it’s a perfect platform for creating new friendships. Dining out in Moraira Moraira doesn’t offer much experience in authentic Spanish cuisine but there is a wide variety of international cuisine available. The exception to this is found on a visit to the numerous Spanish bars in Moraira village. There you’ll find fantastic tapas on the menus. If you’re looking for a formal restaurant then there are hundreds of restaurants to choose from. Some aim at the holidaymakers, others at British expat residents (prices approx 10-15 euros per head). What’s lovely about Moraira is you can go for a meal and walk back to your car in the early hours without any trouble unlike some places. It’s very safe and one of the reasons why it’s so popular with affluent retirees and British expats. Locals will say “good morning/good afternoon/ or good night” and many Spaniards in Moraira speak reasonably good English. However, if you try to speak to them in Spanish, they show their delight and spend time helping you. The natives are lovely! Beaches The main beach in Moraira is Ampolla and is ideal for all ages thanks to its gentle gradient. Those who live in Moraira make regular visits to the lovely secluded sandy bay of El Portet where you can eat and drink looking out across the ocean. El Portet is approx 1k from Moraira centre. There’s lot of car parking available but a walk from the centre is recommended to take in the stunning views on offer. Gaze at the picturesque marina and down into the azure waters of the El Portet beach. In the distance you’ll spot Calpe and the famous Calpe rock. The view of Calpe makes you gratefully realise that Moraira has not succumbed to high-rises. At El Portet beach you’ll find jaw dropping luxury villas clinging to the cliffside, and the walkway behind the beach has several friendly bar/restaurants serving mid-morning coffee and light lunches. Those with a hearty appetite and a full wallet will find a top quality restaurant called Le Dauphin Restaurant overlooking the beach. Their signature dish, oven roasted Crown of Lamb, is superb, and all ingredients for their dishes are freshly sourced each day.